9-11 September 2019
Europe/Lisbon timezone

Accepted Microconferences

Based on the proposals submitted, here are the accepted microconferences at LPC 2019. Congratulations to the MC leads  who have had their proposal accepted. 

 

Accepted microconferences:

 


BPF microconference

After having run a standalone BPF microconference for the first time in last year's [0] [1] [2] Linux Plumbers conference, we've been overwhelmed with throughout positive feedback. We received more submissions than we could have accommodated for the one-day slot, and the room at the conference venue was fully packed despite the fact that the networking track had about half of their submissions with BPF related topics as well.

 

We would like to continue on this success by organizing a BPF micro conference also for 2019. The microconference is aiming to catch BPF related kernel topics mainly in BPF core area as well as having focused discussions in specific subsystems (tracing, security,
networking) with short 1-2 slides in order to get BPF developers together in a face to face working meetup for tackling and hashing out unresolved issues and discussing new ideas.

 

Expected audience

Folks knowledgeable with BPF that work in core areas or in subsystems making use of BPF.

 

Expected topics

  • libbpf, loader unification
  • Standardized BPF ELF format
  • Multi-object semantics and linker-style logic for BPF loaders
  • Improving verifier scalability to 1 million instructions
  • Sleep-able bpf programs
  • State on BPF loop support
  • Proper String support in BPF
  • Indirect calls in BPF
  • BPF timers
  • BPF type format (BTF)
  • Unprivileged BPF
  • BTF of vmlinux
  • BTF annotated raw_tracepoints
  • BPF (k)litmus support
  • bpftool
  • LLVM BPF backend
  • JITs and BPF offloading
  • More to be added based on CfP for this microconference

 

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

 

MC leads

  • Alexei Starovoitov and Daniel Borkmann

 

[0] https://linuxplumbersconf.org/event/2/sessions/16/#20181115 
[1] https://lwn.net/Articles/773198/ 
[2] https://lwn.net/Articles/773605/ 

 

 

 

 


RISC-V microconference

The Linux Plumbers 2019 RISC-V MC will continue the trend established in  2018 [2] to address different relevant problems in RISC-V Linux land.

The overall progress in RISC-V software ecosystem since last year has been really impressive. To continue the similar growth, RISC-V track at Plumbers will focus on finding solutions and discussing ideas that require kernel changes. This will also result in a significant increase in active developer participation in code review/patch submissions which will definitely lead to a better and more stable kernel for RISC-V.

 

Expected topics

  • RISC-V Platform Specification Progress, including some extensions such as power management - Palmer Dabbelt
  • Fixing the Linux boot process in RISC-V (RISC-V now has better support for open source boot loaders like U-Boot and coreboot compared to last year. As a result of this developers can use the same boot loaders to boot Linux on RISC-V as they do in other architectures, but there's more work to be done) - Atish Patra
  • RISC-V hypervisor emulation [5] - Alistair Francis
  • RISC-V hypervisor implementation - Anup Patel
  • NOMMU Linux for RISC-V - Damien Le Moal
  • More to be added based on CfP for this microconference

 

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

 

MC leads

  • Atish Patra (atish.patra@wdc.com) or Palmer Dabbelt (palmer@dabbelt.com)

 

 

[2] https://etherpad.openstack.org/p/RISC-V
 

 

 

 


Tracing microconference

The Linux Plumbers 2019 is pleased to welcome the Tracing microconference again this year. Tracing is once again picking up in activity. New and exciting topics are emerging. 

There is a broad list of ways to perform Tracing in Linux. From the original mainline Linux tracer, Ftrace, to profiling tools like perf, more complex customized tracing like BPF and out of tree tracers like LTTng, systemtap and Dtrace. Come and join us and not only learn but help direct the future progress of tracing inside the Linux kernel and beyond!

 

Expected topics

  • bpf tracing – Anything to do with BPF and tracing combined
  • libtrace – Making libraries from our tools
  • Packaging – Packaging these libraries
  • babeltrace – Anything that we need to do to get all tracers talking to each other
  • Those pesky tracepoints – How to get what we want from places where trace events are taboo
  • Changing tracepoints – Without breaking userspace
  • Function tracing – Modification of current implementation
  • Rewriting of the Function Graph tracer – Can kretprobes and function graph tracer merge as one
  • Histogram and synthetic tracepoints – Making a better interface that is more intuitive to use
  • More to be added based on CfP for this microconference

 

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

 

MC lead

  • Steven Rostedt (rostedt@goodmis.org)

 

 

 

 


Distribution kernels microconference

The upstream kernel community is where active kernel development happens but the majority of kernels deployed do not come directly from upstream but distributions. "Distribution" here can refer to a traditional Linux distribution such as Debian or Gentoo but also Android or a custom cloud distribution. The goal of this Microconference is to discuss common problems that arise when trying to maintain a kernel.

 

Expected topics

  • Backporting kernel patches and how to make it easier
  • Consuming the stable kernel trees
  • Automated testing for distributions
  • Managing ABIs
  • Distribution packaging/infrastructure
  • Cross distribution bug reporting and tracking
  • Common distribution kconfig
  • Distribution default settings
  • Which patch sets are distributions carrying?
  • More to be added based on CfP for this microconference


"Distribution kernel" is used in a very broad manner. If you maintain a kernel tree for use by others, we welcome you to come and share your experiences.


If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

 

MC lead

 

 

 

 


Containers and Checkpoint/Restore MC

The Containers and Checkpoint/Restore MC at Linux Plumbers is the opportunity for runtime maintainers, kernel developers and others involved with containers on Linux to talk about what they are up to and agree on the next major changes to kernel and userspace.

Last year's edition covered a range of subjects and a lot of progress has been made on all of them. There is a working prototype for an id shifting filesystem some distributions already choose to include, proper support for running Android in containers via binderfs, seccomp-based syscall interception and improved container migration through the userfaultfd patchsets.

Last year's success has prompted us to reprise the microconference this year. Topics we would like to cover include:

  • Android containers
  • Agree on an upstreamable approach to shiftfs
  • Securing containres by rethinking parts of ptrace access permissions, restricting or removing the ability to re-open file descriptors through procfs with higher permissions than they were originally created with, and in general how to make procfs more secure or restricted.
  • Adoption and transition of cgroup v2 in container workloads
  • Upstreaming the time namespace patchset
  • Adding a new clone syscall
  • Adoption and improvement of the new mount and pidfd APIs
  • Improving the state of userfaultfd and its adoption in container runtimes
  • Speeding up container live migration
  • Address space separation for containers
  • More to be added based on CfP for this microconference

 

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

 

MC leads

  • Stéphane Graber, Christian Brauner, and Mike Rapoport

 


You, Me and IoT MC

The Internet of Things (IoT) has been growing at an incredible pace as of late.

Some IoT application frameworks expose a model-based view of endpoints, such as

  •     on-off switches
  •     dimmable switches
  •     temperature controls
  •     door and window sensors
  •     metering
  •     cameras

Other IoT application frameworks provide direct device access, by creating real and virtual device pairs that communicate over the network. In those cases, writing to the virtual /dev node on a client affects the real /dev node on the server. Examples are

  •     GPIO (/dev/gpiochipN)
  •     I2C (/dev/i2cN)
  •     SPI (/dev/spiN)
  •     UART (/dev/ttySN)

Interoperability (e.g. ZigBee to Thread) has been a large focus of many vendors due to the surge in popularity of voice-recognition in smart devices and the markets that they are driving. Corporate heavyweights are in full force in those economies. OpenHAB, on the other hand, has become relatively mature as a technology and vendor agnostic open-source front-end for interacting with multiple different IoT frameworks.

The Linux Foundation has made excellent progress bringing together the business community around the Zephyr RTOS, although there are also plenty of other open-source RTOS solutions available. The linux-wpan developers have brought 6LowPan to the community, which works over 802.15.4 and Bluetooth, and that has paved the way for Thread, LoRa, and others. However, some closed or quasi-closed standards must rely on bridging techniques mainly due to license incompatibility. For that reason, it is helpful for the kernel community to preemptively start working on application layer frameworks and bridges, both community-driven and business-driven.

For completely open-source implementations, experimental results have shown results with Greybus, with a significant amount of code already in staging. The immediate benefits to the community in that case are clear. There are a variety of key subjects below the application layer that come into play for Greybus and other frameworks that are actively under development, such as

  1. Device Management
  2. are devices abstracted through an API or is a virtual /dev node provided?
  3. unique ID / management of possibly many virtual /dev nodes and connection info
  4. Network Management
  5. standards are nice (e.g. 802.15.4) and help to streamline in-tree support
  6. non-standard tech best to keep out of tree?
  7. userspace utilities beyond command-line (e.g. NetworkManager, NetLink extensions)
  8.  Network Authentication
  9.  re-use machinery for e.g. 802.11 / 802.15.4 ?
  10.  generic approach for other MAC layers ?
  11.  Encryption
  12.  in userspace via e.g. SSL, /dev/crypto
  13.  Firmware Updates
  14.  generally different protocol for each IoT framework / application layer
  15.  Linux solutions should re-use components e.g. SWUpdate

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

This Microconference will be a meeting ground for industry and hobbyist contributors alike and promises to shed some light on the what is yet to come. There might even be a sneak peak at some new OSHW IoT developer kits.

The hope is that some of the more experienced maintainers in linux-wpan, LoRa and OpenHAB can provide feedback and suggestions for those who are actively developing open-source IoT frameworks, protocols, and hardware.

MC leads

Christopher Friedt <chris@friedt.co>, Jason Kridner <jkridner@beagleboard.org>, and Drew Fustini <drew@beagleboard.org>

 


Live Patching MC

The main purpose of the Linux Plumbers 2019 Live Patching microconference is to involve all stakeholders in open discussion about remaining issues that need to be solved in order to make live patching of the Linux kernel and the Linux userspace live patching feature complete.

The intention is to mainly focus on the features that have been proposed (some even with a preliminary implementation), but not yet finished, with the ultimate goal of sorting out the remaining issues.

This proposal follows up on the history of past LPC live patching microconferences that have been very useful and pushed the development forward a lot.

Currently proposed discussion/presentation topic proposals (we've not gone through "internal selection process yet") with tentatively confirmed attendance:

  •  5 min Intro - What happened in kernel live patching over the last year
  •  API for state changes made by callbacks [1][2]
  •  source-based livepatch creation tooling [3][4]
  •  klp-convert [5][6]
  •  livepatch developers guide
  •  userspace live patching

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

MC leads

Jiri Kosina <jkosina@suse.cz> and Josh Poimboeuf <jpoimboe@redhat.com>
 


Open Printing MC

The Open Printing (OP) organisation works on the development of new printing architectures, technologies, printing infrastructure, and interface standards for Linux and Unix-style operating systems. OP collaborates with the IEEE-ISTO Printer Working Group (PWG) on IPP projects.

We maintain cups-filters which allows CUPS to be used on any Unix-based (non-macOS) system. Open Printing also maintains the Foomatic database which is a database-driven system for integrating free software printer drivers with CUPS under Unix. It supports every free software printer driver known to us and every printer known to work with these drivers.

Today it is very hard to think about printing in UNIX based OSs without the involvement of Open Printing. Open Printing has been successful in implementing driverless printing following the IPP standards proposed by the PWG as well.

Proposed Topics:

  • Working with SANE to make IPP scanning a reality. We need to make scanning work without device drivers similar to driverless printing.
  • Common Print Dialog Backends.
  • Printer/Scanner Applications - The new format for printer and scanner drivers. A simple daemon emulating a driverless IPP printer and/or scanner.
  • The Future of Printer Setup Tools - IPP Driverless Printing and IPP System Service. Controlling tools like cups-browsed (or perhaps also the print dialog backends?) to make the user's print dialogs only showing the relevant ones or to create printer clusters.
  • 3D Printing without the use of any slicer. A filter that can convert a stl code to a gcode.

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

MC leads

Till Kamppeter (till.kamppeter@gmail.com ) or Aveek Basu (basu.aveek@gmail.com)


Toolchains MC

The goal of the Toolchains Microconference is to focus on specific topics related to the GNU Toolchain and Clang/LLVM that have a direct impact in the development of the Linux kernel.

The intention is to have a very practical MC, where toolchain and kernel hackers can engage and, together:

  •     Identify problems, needs and challenges.
  •     Propose, discuss and agree on solutions for these specific problems.
  •     Coordinate on how to implement the solutions, in terms of interfaces, patches submissions, etc in both kernel and toolchain component.

Consequently, we will discourage vague and general "presentations" in favor of concreteness and to-the-point discussions, encouraging the participation of everyone present.

Examples of topics to cover:

  •     Header harmonization between kernel and glibc.
  •     Wrapping syscalls in glibc.
  •     eBPF support in toolchains.
  •     Potential impact/benefit/detriment of recently developed GCC optimizations on the kernel.
  •     Kernel hot-patching and GCC.
  •     Online debugging information: CTF and BTF

If you are interested in participating in this microconference and have topics to propose, please use the CfP process. More topics will be added based on CfP for this microconference.

MC leads

Jose E. Marchesi <jose.marchesi@oracle.com> and Elena Zannoni <ezannoni@gmail.com>
 


 

More microconferences

More microconferences will be announced every week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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